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Our Beliefs

Traditionally, we have emphasized the following.

  • God will comfort, guide, and forgive every person, no matter who they are or what they’ve done.
  • Serving others and Christian faith go hand in hand.
  • We find peace with God and spiritual fulfillment both in solitary moments of reflection and in a community of faith.
  • Our Church is made up of people who share faith in Jesus Christ.
  • We seek to make our private and our public actions congruent with our faith.
  • We are a global movement of churches that’s making a difference in the world.

In practice, we are similar to other Protestant denominations, affirming our beliefs through the sacred symbols of baptism and communion. For a deeper discussion of the United Methodist’s beliefs, visit the United Methodist website.

“We are welcoming and open to all people: black or white, yellow or brown, you are welcome here; rich or poor, young or old, you are welcome here; gay or straight, citizen or sojourner, you are welcome here.”

Baptism

Through baptism, we accept God’s gifts through Jesus. There is no strict rule among United Methodists about how baptism must be performed, although sprinkling water on the head of the person being baptized is most common. For a deeper discussion about baptism, visit the United Methodist site.

Communion – First Sunday of Each Month

On the first Sunday of each month, we serve communion at each worship service. All are welcome at Christ’s table; you need not be a member of this church. We receive communion by intinction — receiving the bread, dipping it in the cup, and taking both elements together.

In the simple act of eating and drinking, the community of faith proclaims and participates in all that God has done, is doing, and will continue to do for us in Christ. All United Methodist congregations use some form of bread and some form of grape juice, not wine. The use of unfermented juice of the grape accommodates children and those who are recovering alcoholics.

Simple bread and sharing a cup have a powerful meaning for us. Charles Wesley’s line in a hymn says it well: “The sign transmits the signified.” While they remain bread and fruit of the grape, they are symbols that connect us to the love and power of God. The love is shown in the choice of Jesus to suffer death on the cross and the power is shown in God’s raising Jesus from the grave to be with us as he was with the disciples on the first Easter and in subsequent days. See Luke 24:28-35 & 36-43; John 21:9-14. With other Christians, United Methodists believe that Communion is a sharing in the life of God and a meeting with the living Jesus, who forgives and claims us as his own disciples.

To read more about communion on the official United Methodist Church website, click here. Please contact our Senior Pastor Rev. Carol Sparks if you have any questions about this portion of our service or any other spiritual matters.

Affirmation of Faith written by the people of Holy Covenant

We, as free and committed members of Christ's body, a community that proclaims the living presence of our Lord, are striving to express our love and our hope, our acceptance and our dedication to the principle of Christianity. Because we are a Holy Covenant, we are receptive to all persons, advocates of those in need, and committed to serving through action and acceptance as Christ served and accepted all people. We believe that our relationship with God is an awakening through Scripture, Tradition, Experience and Reason, enriched in the warmth of fellowship and worship. We are free to differ in love and understanding; free to seek and find truth, and obligated to share truth that all people might be free, God being our guide.

MICAH 6:8 He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?